Calla Lilies for a Classy Broad

Chic, charming and always in style, calla lilies are the perfect flower for the classy lady in your life. Be it a birthday, anniversary, thank you or yoo-hoo sort of occasion, these elegant blooms have panache and character that make them stand out from the rest of the bunch. When you just can’t seem to think of a good gift, the gift of flowers is always one she’ll be sure to use.

A Lyrical Bouquet for National Poetry Day

Putting together words to form a poem that moves and inspires is not unlike creating a lovely vase of flowers, with each stem coming together to form an arrangement that delights or comforts. On August 21st, National Poetry Day, why not compose your own floral sonnet with some of the profound flowers below that can speak volumes in the <a href="http://www.therightflowers.com/the-language-of-flower

Flowers that Celebrate Flight for National Aviation Day

From the earliest humans that looked to the birds soaring high in the sky down to the frequent flier grumbling their way barefoot through Security, it’s hard not to be awed by the miracle of flight. Every August 19th, National Aviation Day is set aside to take a moment to appreciate humankind’s journey into the wild blue yonder with events, activities, or perhaps just a look up at the heavens. Established in 1939 by President Franklin Roosevelt, the holiday coincides with the birthday of Orville Wright who, along with his brother, helped begin the field of aviation which has taken us from canvas wings on a bicycle into the outer orbits of our world.

Celebrate Senior Citizens Day with Carnations

They say growing old is not for whimps and this August 21st is an opportunity to admire those who have accomplished it with flair on National Senior Citizens day. Whether someone you love has reached a ripe, old age or you’d like to brighten the day of a silver hair in your community, consider the comely carnation as the right flower to honor a person getting along in years. Said to represent both admiration, affection and pride in the language of flowers, it is the perfect pick for National Senior Citizens Day.

Help Someone Heal from a Long Term Health Condition with Yarrow

In almost every language, the toast given with raised glasses around the table is to “health.” The ultimate universal currency, few things are as heartily wished for or as ardently missed as good health. Many people, when struggling with short term illnesses, have a greater appreciation for their vigor and strength once they recover, but most of us- when faced with a chronic or long term condition- will struggle both in body and mind to remain positive and hopeful. While cards and caring words can help convey our love and encouragement, flowers have actually been shown in scientific experiments to help in the recovery process by reducing pain, anxiety and fatigue, as well as blood pressure and stress. Long used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes, yarrow has long been associated with a sense of healing and in the language of flowers sends the message of a return to good health.

3 Ways to Say “You’re Beautiful” with Flowers

Variegated Tulip

In the language of flowers, different blooms convey different messages from giver to receiver. To plants, however, flowers mean just one thing- sex. Long before the first flowers unfurled their tantalizing petals, plants had evolved a number of ways to spread their DNA around the planet, such as spores that could be carried on the wind or via water. These methods had drawbacks, the largest of which being the lack of diversity that comes from not being able to cast ones’ seed far and wide, yet specifically targeted, amongst a wide variety of potential lovers. Flowering plants did not emerge until the first fluttering pollinators found them as the ideal site for acquiring nectar and pollen and serving as the perfect hang-out for meeting potential mates. In exchange, plants that were rooted to the ground and potentially geographically isolated from others of its species could send a message of love (i.e. pollen rich with their own DNA) via the fuzzy backs and legs of these insects. This allowed their genes to travel across the meadows and fields to an awaiting bloom to receive this genetic gift, fertilize their ovules and develop into a tasty fruit rich with seeds carrying their combined traits to all future generations of this flower. Not much has changed in the last millennia. Flowers still mean, ahem…well- they are still a great way to tell someone that you appreciate their fine-looking DNA.

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